News & Research

RESEARCH & STATISTICS ON AGEING & PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Opportunities to be involved in research

 

LATEST NEWS 

 

Starting with 15 mins a day makes a difference

Eat a Mediterranean diet to reduce hip fractures

Lifestyle risk factors & mortality

 

 

ARCHIVED NEWS

Read past news & research articles

 


 

Participants sought for home-based exercise research

Are you interested in taking part in a study investigating the benefits of home-based exercise? It is FREE! And you gain the benefits from the exercise!

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Invitation to participate in a study on physical activity & older adults

You may have heard a number of things about the importance of physical activity for older adults' health and well-being. Griffith University (Qld) are conducting a project to examine the factors that influence physical activity in older Australians.

The project involves filling out a survey that asks older adults about their habits, attitudes and beliefs about physical activity, followed by two very short telephone-based surveys, one and two weeks later.

The University warmly WELCOMES individuals to participate who are:
- aged 65 years and over;
- living independently in the community (including retirement village setting); and,
- able to engage in physical activity of at least moderate-intensity.

You can participate in the study now by clicking on the link here. We would also greatly appreciate if you can pass on the study information to your networks and anyone who may be willing to participate.

 


Latest News

 

Just 15 mins activity a day can make a difference

In a study reported by the European Society of Cardiology, adults over 60 doing the equivalent of 15 minutes of brisk walking a day had a 22% lower risk of death. So being unable to do the recommended 30 minutes a day is no reason to put off getting started.

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Eat a Meditteranean diet to reduce hip fractures

This study of post-menopausal women found that following a Mediterranean diet (fruit, vegetables, moderate protein from meat, fish, whole grains) was associated with reduced risk of hip fractures.

Read more

 

Lifestyle behaviours impacting mortality

A large Australian study (over 230,000 participants aged over 45) looks at the impact of lifestyle risk behaviours including physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour.

Read more

 

 

 


 

Archived News

 

Walk more, live longer

Modest aerobic exercise can improve brain function

Improve sleep with physical activity

Carers benefit from aerobic exercise

Stretching the Dollar Forum 2015

More evidence of the dangers of being inactive

 A medium level of physical activity can reduce Parkinson's risk

 The benefits of physical activity for people living with dementia

Increase physical activity to reduce heart failure risk

Be active to maintain brain health

Comedy Debate - Will you still need me when I'm 64?

40 is not too late to start exercising

Sitting for 2 hours as harmful as 20 mins exercise is beneficial

Exercise may cut breast cancer risk in older women

Physical activity helps frail older adults stay mobile

Physical inactivity worse for women than a high BMI

Even light exercise can reduce disability from knee osteoarthritis

Heart rate formula for older adults revised

New Sitting Risk: Disability After 60

New physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines

Muscle strengthening lowers risk of type 2 diabetes

Regular exercise can reduce dementia risk

Research confirms - It's never too late to start exercising

Eating for Health

What's your health & fitness age?

Radio interview with our EO Gayle Rogers

 Get active with others for more benefits

What's the best single thing we can do for our health?

 

 

Walk more, live longer

This large scale Australian study conducted over 10 years confirms that increasing your number of daily steps has a significant impact on health.

Going from sedentary to 10,000 steps a day reduces mortality by a massive 46%, and even increasing from sedentary to 3,000 steps reduces mortality by 12%.

Read more

Modest aerobic exercise can improve brain function

This US study examines the potential benefits of aerobic exercise on brain function in older adults.

Read more

 

Improve sleep with physical activity

This study found that middle aged people engaged in moderate to high intensity physical activity and older people engaged in moderate to low intensity activity had significant improvements in sleep patterns.

Read more

 

Carers benefit from aerobic exercise

This US study on the Impact of 6-Month Aerobic Exercise on Alzheimer's Symptoms showed that carers receive significant benefit from being more active.

Read more

 

Stretching the Dollar Forum

Active Ageing Australia and the ACH Group held an interactive forum and exchange session at West Adelaide Football Club in November 2015 to address topics like managing financial stress, understanding Centrelink, and staying active on a budget.

Presentations and discussions were followed by a workshop session, with participants sharing their ideas on how to stretch your dollar when shopping, travelling and preparing for Christmas. We are happy to share the many great ideas with you!

Read our money saving tips!

 

Being inactive can be more risky than being overweight

This large scale study suggests that physical inactivity may be responsible for more than twice as many deaths as general obesity in this European population.

Read more

 

A medium level of physical activity can reduce risk of Parkinson's Disease

In a large study from Sweden, it was shown that a medium level of daily total physical activity is associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease, especially in males. The inverse association between physical activity and Parkinson's disease risk was also observed for higher levels of household activity, commuting activity, and exercise.

Read more

 

The benefits of physical activity for people living with dementia

Alzheimer's Australia NSW has released a discussion paper on  the benefits of physical activity and exercise for people living with dementia.

Read more

Increase physical acitivity to reduce heart failure risk

A Swedish study of nearly 40,000 people followed from 1997 to 2010 has concluded that increased leisure time physical activity is related to a reduced risk of heart failure.

Read more

Be active to maintain brain health

This study into the relationship between levels of physical activity, sedentary behaviour and white matter lesions in the brain confirms that being physically active and avoiding long periods of sitting are important for brain health in older adults.

Read more

Comedy Debate - Will you still need me when I'm 64?


Held on Wed 29th October 2014 at the Mercury Theatre, Adelaide, this comedy debate was a tremendous success thanks to our guest debaters, who brought great fun and passion to the proceedings:

Dorinda HafnerDave Flanagan

Ali Clarke, adjudicator

celebrity chef Dorinda Hafner

comedian Dave Flanagan

radio presenters Ben & Liam, FreshFM

our own Pauline Brooks, and


special guest Colin Milner, CEO, International Council on Active Ageing, Canada.

View some highlights in this short video, filmed on Kaurna land by CineSky. CONTACT: Jordan Edmeades - 0487 706 320.

#CelebrateAge supported by:

CAHML

Office for the Ageing, SA Health

SAHealthlogohorizontal

 

pride advice logo

APIA logo  

 

 

 

 

40 is not too late to start exercising

Research from the French Institute of Health and Medical Research has shown that men who started endurance training after 40 enjoyed similar long-term heart health benefits as those who started training before 30.

Read more

 

Sitting for 2 hours as harmful as 20 mins exercise is beneficial 

Cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center found that sedentary behaviors may lower cardiorespiratory fitness levels, independent of exercise.

Read more

 

Exercise may cut breast cancer risk in older women

As reported in WebMD on 11/8/14, French researchers have found that regular physical activity cuts the odds of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, but that protection disappears if women stop exercising.

Read more

 

Physical activity helps frail older adults stay mobile

In this study from the University of Florida, researchers recruited 1,635 sedentary men and women ages 70 to 89 who could walk 400m within 15 minutes but were at risk of losing that ability. Results showed that daily moderate physical activity may mean the difference between seniors being able to keep up everyday activities or becoming housebound.

Read more

 

Physical inactivity worse for women than a high BMI

A study from the University of Queensand found that physical inactivity, rather than prolonged sitting or body weight, was the most important predictor of high health care costs for middle-aged women.

Read more

 

Even light exercise can reduce disability from knee osteoarthritis

A recent report from the US showed an association between greater daily time spent in light intensity physical activities and reduced risk of onset and progression of disability in adults with osteoarthritis of the knee or risk factors for knee osteoarthritis. An increase in daily physical activity time may reduce the risk of disability, even if the intensity of that additional activity is not increased.
BMJ 2014;348:g2472

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Heart rate formula for older  adults revised

Ever felt that the formula "220 minus your age" doesn't give a true indication of your maximum heart rate?  A recent study has found that the formula, first developed 40 years ago, is not accurate for older adults - and women in particular - as it  doesn't take into account the decline in peak heart rate as we age.  Women in the age range of 40 to 89 years should expect their maximum heart rate to be 200 minus 67 percent of their age. In men, the formula is 216 minus 93 percent of their age. CardioSource March 27, 2014

 

New sitting risk: Disability after 60

This study from Northwestern University shows that regardless of exercise, too much sedentary time is linked to major disability  after 60.

  Read more

 

New Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines

With the catchphrase Make your Move – Sit Less – Be Active for Life! the new physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines were released in February 2014, reflecting the importance of reducing sitting time as well as increasing physical activity. The other major change is the addition of a recommendation to include strength training at least twice a week.

The Tips & Ideas for Older Australians (65 plus) fact sheet supplements the Choose Health: Be Active: A Physical Activity Guide for Older Australians booklet.

Read more

 

 Muscle Strengthening lowers risk of Type 2 Diabetes

 A recent Harvard School of Public Health study has shown that women engaging in at least 150 minutes a week of muscle strengthening and conditioning (eg resistance exercises, yoga) have a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes.  Those who did both aerobic activity for at least 150 minutes and muscle strengthening for at least 60 minutes had an even greater benefit. (Published: January 14, 2014 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001587)

Read more

 

Regular exercise can reduce dementia risk

Researchers from Cardiff University followed the health habits of 2,235 men over a 35-year period, and found that exercise significantly reduces the risk of dementia.  The study identifies five healthy behaviours as being integral to reducing the incidence of chronic disease: taking regular exercise, non-smoking, a healthy bodyweight, a healthy diet and a low alcohol intake. (Reported in Cardiff University News Centre 10/12/13).

Read more

 

Research confirms - It's never too late to start exercising

A study reported in the British Journal of Sports Medicine has confirmed that even taking up physical activity later in life is associated with improved overall health. (Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2013-092993)

Read more

 

Eating for Health and Wellbeing

 guide to healthy eatingWe all occasionally need a reminder of what and how much to eat for health and wellbeing.  There's no need to avoid special treats altogether, but take a 'little and sometimes' approach with high calorie foods like chocolate, cake, chips and alcohol.

Visit eatforhealth.org.au

 

What's your health and fitness age?

This online tool from Queensland Health reveals your health and fitness age, based on your answers to a series of questions on your physical activity levels, diet and lifestyle - fun and informative!

Find out more

 

Radio interview with our EO Gayle Rogers

In this interview for Radio Adelaide's Roundabout program, Gayle discusses the benefits of phyical activity and the range of opportunities available.

Listen to the interview

 

 Get active with others for more benefits

Research being conducted by Professor Tim Olds of UniSA suggests that the type of activity and it's context are important in ensuring we reap the maximum health benefits of the recommendation.

In a recent article for the UniSA Newsletter, Professor Olds states: "I believe those guidelines should suggest that while any kind of physical activity is good, for the best results the physical activity should be something you enjoy rather than a chore, it should be done with other people and ideally it should provide some exposure to nature." In other words, getting outdoors with others and doing something enjoyable is more effective than activities done on your own or that feel like a chore rather than a pleasure - an observation which is certainly borne out by anecdotal evidence from participants of EMAA classes and from participants in the 5 for 10 project. Time and again, feedback indicates that the social nature of the activities add greatly to the enjoyment, which in turn adds to people's motivation to continue.

Read the full article

 

23 and 1/2 hours: What is the single best thing we can do for our health?

This video by Dr Mike Evans discusses the benefits of exercise as medicine, including how much, how often and how intense. View here.